Farm Cart, LLC

406-223-5460

Bozeman, MT, USA

©2019 by Farm Cart, LLC. Proudly created with Wix.com

  • Farm Cart

Delivery 3/11/20

Updated: 5 days ago


ITEMS

  1. Arugula

  2. Oyster Mushrooms

  3. Coleslaw Mix

  4. Sweet Beet + Garlic Pickles

  5. Dozen Eggs

  6. Sourdough Boule (round)

PRODUCERS

  1. Terra Greens Produce - Manhattan

  2. Mother Fungi - Missoula

  3. Root Cellar Foods - Belgrade

  4. Roots Kitchen & Cannery - Bozeman

  5. Farm Fresh Eggs - Manhattan

  6. Wild Crumb - Bozeman

Veggie Soba Noodle Salad

With Root Cellar Foods' Coleslaw Mix, this salad is ultra-quick to prepare. Eat it as a side dish or a fresh, simple meal on it's own. Add some cooked protein (egg, tofu, chicken, etc.) if you like. Soba are a Japanese noodle made from buckwheat flour, shaped like thin, flat spaghetti. They're not hard to find in the "Asian Food" or "international" sections of the grocery store, but if you want to substitute something else, most any wheat-based noodle of a similar shape will work...even actual spaghetti noodles, though you'll lose a bit of the earthy appeal of soba.  Serves 4-6


12 ounces Soba Noodles

1/4 C soy sauce or tamari

2 Tbs brown sugar - you can sub honey, or Hummingbird's Kitchen ginger tea concentrate, too

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 Tbs rice wine vinegar or other mild vinegar

1/4 C toasted sesame oil

2 C Coleslaw mix, or more

1/2 C thinly sliced oyster mushrooms (optional)

Garnishes: sliced green onion, sesame seeds, cilantro, chili oil or a chili sauce like Sriracha


Cook noodles according to package and drain. In a large bowl, whisk together soy sauce, sugar, garlic, and vinegar. Slowly add the sesame oil while whisking. Toss veggies and noodles in the bowl with the sauce until it's all well-distributed. Top with garnishes of your choice.


Notes: To make without coleslaw mix, substitute an equal volume of any thinly sliced veggies that sound good, like sliced carrot, cabbage, cucumber, bell pepper, kale, arugula, etc.

Quick Homemade Ramen with Mushrooms

This recipe has all the warm, salty comfort of packaged ramen, and it only takes a few extra steps and ingredients to bypass the seasoning packets. I've been able to find dried ramen noodles that aren't the rectangular blocks with seasoning packets next to the soba and somen noodles at the store. If you can't find plain ramen, though, somen or soba noodles work well. Or, use the ramen blocks if you like - the main difference is that the blocks of curly noodles have been fried in oil before they're dried. Serves 2-4.


8 C chicken or vegetable broth, homemade or store bought, whatever you have

2 Tbs soy sauce or tamari (to watch the sodium content, start with less and add to taste)

1 Tbs rice wine vinegar

1 Tbs oyster sauce (optional)

~2 C oyster mushrooms, sliced - you can sub fresh or frozen shiitakes, cremini, or a mix

6 oz dried ramen noodles, seasoning packet discarded if you're using ramen packets. 

2 tsp toasted sesame oil

~1 C Coleslaw Mix, or more as desired

1-2 scallions, thinly sliced

Eggs, 1 per person, soft boiled or poached (optional)

Garnishes: cilantro or arugula, roughly chopped, chili sauce, etc.


In a large Dutch oven or saucepan, bring the broth to a simmer over medium heat. Stir in the soy sauce, vinegar, and oyster sauce. Add the mushrooms, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 4-5 minutes to infuse the broth with mushroom flavor.


Add the ramen noodles and turn up the heat to medium. Cook until the noodles are al dente, stirring periodically, according to package directions. Stir in the sesame oil, coleslaw mix (or sub any thinly sliced vegetables you like), and scallions. Cook for another minute, maybe two, just to soften the veggies slightly.


Divide into bowls, add egg and/or garnishes as desired, and more soy sauce to taste.


Notes: Here are links to "jammy" boiled eggs and poached eggs, if you're interested in adding either to your ramen. Sometimes I'm feeling lazy and I poach the eggs right in the soup for about 3 minutes, then scoop each into a bowl, then top with the noodles and broth. It overcooks the noodles and veggies, but saves a little time.


Other proteins, like leftover cooked chicken, beef, or pork, or firm tofu, could also be added with the other veggies to heat through before serving.

Other Recipe Suggestions: